33 names of things you never knew had names

I can’t resist webpages such as this one.
Fascinating stuff.
Be sure to check out the ‘French Toast Casserole’ post under my ‘Top Dogs’ listing.
Hopefully, it’s still there.
Have a bitchin’ Monday!
~m

  1. AGLET
    The plain or ornamental covering on the end of a shoelace.
  2. ARMSAYE
    The armhole in clothing.
  3. CHANKING
    Spat-out food, such as rinds or pits.
  4. COLUMELLA NASI
    The bottom part of the nose between the nostrils.
  5. DRAGÉES
    Small beadlike pieces of candy, usually silver-coloured, used for decorating cookies, cakes and sundaes.
  6. FEAT
    A dangling curl of hair.
  7. FERRULE
    The metal band on a pencil that holds the eraser in place.
  8. HARP
    The small metal hoop that supports a lampshade.
  9. HEMIDEMISEMIQUAVER
    A 64th note. (A 32nd is a demisemiquaver, and a 16th note is a semiquaver.)
  10. JARNS,
  11. NITTLES,
  12. GRAWLIX,
  13. and QUIMP
    Various squiggles used to denote cussing in comic books.
  14. KEEPER
    The loop on a belt that keeps the end in place after it has passed through the buckle.
  15. KICK or PUNT
    The indentation at the bottom of some wine bottles. It gives added strength to the bottle but lessens its holding capacity.
  16. LIRIPIPE
    The long tail on a graduate’s academic hood.
  17. MINIMUS
    The little finger or toe.
  18. NEF
    An ornamental stand in the shape of a ship.
  19. OBDORMITION
    The numbness caused by pressure on a nerve; when a limb is `asleep’.
  20. OCTOTHORPE
    The symbol `#’ on a telephone handset. Bell Labs’ engineer Don Macpherson created the word in the 1960s by combining octo-, as in eight, with the name of one of his favourite athletes, 1912 Olympic decathlon champion Jim Thorpe.
  21. OPHRYON
    The space between the eyebrows on a line with the top of the eye sockets.
  22. PEEN
    The end of a hammer head opposite the striking face.
  23. PHOSPHENES
    The lights you see when you close your eyes hard. Technically the luminous impressions are due to the excitation of the retina caused by pressure on the eyeball.
  24. PURLICUE
    The space between the thumb and extended forefinger.
  25. RASCETA
    Creases on the inside of the wrist.
  26. ROWEL
    The revolving star on the back of a cowboy’s spurs.
  27. SADDLE
    The rounded part on the top of a matchbook.
  28. SCROOP
    The rustle of silk.
  29. SNORKEL BOX
    A mailbox with a protruding receiver to allow people to deposit mail without leaving their cars.
  30. SPRAINTS
    Otter dung.
  31. TANG
    The projecting prong on a tool or instrument.
  32. WAMBLE
    Stomach rumbling.
  33. ZARF
    A holder for a handleless coffee cup.
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11 thoughts on “33 names of things you never knew had names

  1. I HAD a bitchin monday! Just about time for me to have a snooze – that means sleep 🙂
    Some weird and wonderful words there, dare you to use at least one of them in each of your next 33 posts!
    Kelly

    Oh, Gaad… (hanging my head) 😉
    ~m

    Like

  2. I was just dusting my few bottles of wine last night and noticed one of them had a kick, or punt. That might be the only one I remember. I hope I don’t get the two names confused. Like one Christmas Eve when I was with my husband’s mother and family and we were talking about her next door neighbor, whose name was Kerm Spurlock. I called him Sperm and didn’t even realize it till everyone started laughing.

    Ah, the wonders of the English language.
    ~m

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  3. I knew aglet, peen, harp and punt. I love this kind of trivia. I can’t remember the names of people I met five minutes ago, but I remember this crap.

    Knowing aglet, peen, harp and punt has me seriously wondering about you, Lass. 😉
    ~m

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  4. I love this! I knew 1, 5, 7, 14 and 22,,,,,now I am pondering the question on how to incorporate said words into my daily conversation. That should be a lot of fun!

    You knew 5 of them?
    I should introduce you to Lass
    ~m

    Like

  5. What the hell happend to you? Someone force-feed you a dictionary? 8) I knew some of these, but not most. Now, can you tell me what you call the small bit of ground between a freshly dug grave and the resulting pile of dirt that sits next to it? Believe it or not there is a word for this, and I used to know it, but I can’t remember it. Damn it!

    Skoropa knows what the word is.
    ~m

    Like

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